2 sleeper or family room (2 adults, 2 children)

Air conditioning Tea and coffee station Spacious patio Bar fridge

Our rooms are configured as Twin Single (2 single beds), Double (Queen size bed) or Family rooms (Queen size bed and two single pull-out beds for children under 12 years old). Our rooms are fully air-conditioned, each with a patio overlooking our lush gardens. There are braai (BBQ) facilities on site, coffee bar / restaurant, secure parking and our units are serviced daily.

Other facilities include:

  • Free Wifi
  • Secure Parking
  • Designated Smoking Areas
  • Airconditioing
  • Patio
  • Workstation
4

Rooms sleep 2 adults or family of 4 (2 adults, 2 children)

50

Rooms

SleepOver Komatipoort is proud to have an 8.4 guest rating on Bookings.com

Things to do near Komatipoort

Komatipoort is a town situated at the confluence of the Crocodile and Komati Rivers in Mpumalanga province, South Africa. The town is 8km from the Crocodile Bridge Gate into the Kruger Park, and just 5km from the Mozambique border and 65km from the Eswatini border.

Attractions near Komatipoort

Crocodile Bridge Gate is the most eastern entrance to the Kruger National Park. It lies roughly 12 kilometres from Komatipoort, close to the Mozambican border.
The largest game reserve in South Africa, the Kruger National Park is larger than Israel. Nearly 2 million hectares of land that stretch for 352 kilometres (20 000 square kilometres) from north to south along the Mozambique border, is given over to an almost indescribable wildlife experience. Certainly it ranks with the best in Africa and is the flagship of the country’s national parks - rated as the ultimate safari experience.
Not only are the Sudwala caves near Nelspruit regarded as the oldest known caves in the world but the caves rest in Pre-cambrian dolomite rocks that are also amongst the second oldest known sedimentary rocks on Earth. Imagine a system of caves over 30 kilometres in length, of which only 600 metres is accessible, that date back 3 000 million years to a time when incredible stresses cracked the dolomite of the Mankelekele Mountains (also spelt Makelexele) - part of the Drakensberg escarpment that separates the highveld from the lowveld of the Mpumalanga Province - allowing water to slowly trickle, forming a series of passages through the rocks.